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America Is Beautiful! Happy #242 Birthday !

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O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea.

America is unique in the history of the world. It is a beautiful country filled with beautiful people, accomplishing beautiful feats. Although quite imperfect, there persists a thread of greatness in the U.S. that still attracts more would-be immigrants than it can possibly accept. 

Unlike countries tied together by common blood lines, the United States is a different model tied together by the principles of natural law. Our raison d’être is established in the Declaration of Independence. Every subsequent law implements the fact that all men, whatever differences they may have in skin color, talents, ancestry, wealth, or intelligence are created equal. That is, each one is entitled to equality of respect and opportunity, but not the equality of circumstances. 

During two-hundred and forty-two years since the founding, this type of government and environment have produced men and women of uncommon valor, talent, and generosity. While the country has, unfortunately,  produced criminals in the government, in the churches, and in the general population, it has also unleashed an unbelievable amount of creativity that benefits everyone. The fields of technology and machinery alone have transformed the daily life of people in every corner of the world. 

Five times in the twentieth century, American military forces offered their wealth, their weapons, their time, their talent, and their lives to save people in other countries from tyrants. Today, on July 4, 2018, we at One Eye and Half Sense, honor that particular beauty – the beauty of selflessness. 

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Arlington Cemetery – Procession to the burial site.

O beautiful for pilgrim feet,
Whose stern impassion’d stress
A thoroughfare for freedom beat
Across the wilderness!
America! America! God mend thine ev’ry flaw,
Confirm thy soul in self-control,
Thy liberty in law!

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O beautiful for heroes proved In liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved,
And mercy more than life!
America! America! May God thy gold refine
Till all success be nobleness,
And ev’ry gain divine!

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O Beautiful for patriot dream
That sees beyond the years
Thine alabaster cities gleam,
Undimmed by human tears!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!

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“No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”        John 15:13

 The US Cemetery at Normandy, just above Omaha Beach is pictured above. As you walk around the cemetery with row upon row upon row of crosses and Stars of Davids, it finally begins to dawn on you the enormity of the sacrifice that Americans made to save Europe in World War II.

Having talked to two survivors of the D-Day invasion, I assure you that those 18 to 30 year-old young men were frightened by what they saw and what they endured. And yet, they bravely obeyed in spite of their fears, in spite of trembling hands, in spite of vomiting at the carnage surrounding them. And where they could not obey original orders because of snafus, they improvised. There is no way to thank even the ones who came home and lived long lives, much less the ones who perished defending freedom.

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This is the original quote by General Clark at Anzio, Italy. Part of it was carved into a wall at the Normandy Beach Memorial.

“On Memorial Day we visited the American cemetery at Anzio and saw the curving rows of white crosses that spoke eloquently of the price that America and her Allies had paid for the liberation of Italy. “If ever proof were needed that we fought for a cause and not for conquest, it could be found in these cemeteries. Here was our only conquest: all we asked of Italy was enough of her soil in which to bury our gallant dead.” ”        General Mark W. Clark

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Another view of the Normandy Memorial Cemetery. American soldiers volunteered to die for their own people and for the oppressed people across the ocean whom they did not know and whose language and customs were foreign to them. They were idealistic young men who wanted to preserve freedom for others.

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Over-view of the Normandy Cemetery showing the Memorial Building which houses artifacts and documents about the battle.

None of us are forgetful of other wars brave American soldiers have fought in since the decisive World War II: Korea, Vietnam, and the Middle East.  The United States has paid a high price with both blood and treasure in conflicts that some have deemed unnecessary. While God determines whose decisions were righteous and whose were selfish, the unique people of this unique nation remain loyal, diligent, and obedient even when sent on questionable missions because they    “more than self their country loved, and mercy more than life!”

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Plato’s Beautiful Way to Build the Brain

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While mankind’s intellectual achievements have increased by magnitudes in the centuries since Plato’s and Socrates’ era, in 2018 we still stand on their shoulders to get our “better view” of the world. In many ways we still rely on their fundamental understanding of the nature of man as we search for wisdom and ideas appropriate to our present situation. 

Or, as Dr. John Cuddeback has claimed, “Nothing is said that has not already been said by a Greek.”

Musicians, educators, and music lovers during the intervening centuries have often found these early philosophers’ emphatic insistence on the importance of music in education somewhat curious, if not bizarre. Plato, et al, believed that music not only prepared one’s mind to easily learn, it also trained the soul to seek justice. Music, mathematics, and rhetoric were The three pillars of  Greek education. They maintained that music was of primary usefulness, not only to young school children, but also an integral part of training the military forces.  In fact, they asserted that  music is the highest form of communication.

However, in the Twentieth and Twenty-first centuries, too often music is just considered “nice.” It would be a “nice” addition to the curriculum if the school board can figure out a way to include something, anything, that could possibly be called “music education.” More frequently, it is ignored because “nice” does not compel. In today’s American culture, music education in the early grades appears to be reserved for those who can afford the “niceties” of private schools and/or private music lessons. 

But, are we becoming “too big for our britches?” Have we traded wisdom for technology instead of adding technology to wisdom?

In recent years, there have been numerous scientific experiments that support the early Greeks’ understanding of music as foundational to education. Thus,  *Andrew Pudewa, Director of the Institute for Excellence in Writing, believes music training can be a way to “build more RAM” into one’s brain. One source he cites is a 1997 study on preschool children. Before dividing them into groups, all took the same I.Q. test. Then one group spent  six months of keyboard training, while a second group had six months of instruction in singing, a third group received training in using computers, and the last group spent their months in free play. At the end, all four groups took the same I.Q. test again. The group of pre-schoolers who spent six months learning to play music on a keyboard increased their spatial-temporal I.Q. scores by an average of 46%, far higher than the other three groups. Obviously something happened in their brains to make that big of a jump in mental ability. Let me repeat that to be certain you understand: a mere six months of training pre-schoolers to play music on a keyboard increased their cognitive abilities by 46%.

The bigger jumps in mental ability through learning to play a musical instrument occurs primarily in the younger ages. Still, older children and adults can improve test scores by listening to classical music while studying and just before tests. The Piano Guys, who have done much to popularize good music, even offer YouTube videos to accompany study sessions. They call it **The Ultimate Study Music: 90 Minute Cram Jam. 

Another source for information about music training – playing an instrument, not just music theory, that is – is a commercial web site for the National Educational Music Company: nemc.com. It offers numerous general interest articles about the benefits of music training for children under the Support tab.

The proposition that was posited by the Greek philosophers thousands of years ago, has been proven in scientific experiments during the last 50 years on people and labratory rats. Thus, we can say with certitude that good music improves mental ability in humans and animals. Some have even concluded that plants are affected by music, but that’s another subject altogether.

The bottom line is that the practice of training  young children to play musical instruments is not as wide spread as it should be. Since three to ten year-olds can not purchase or rent musical instruments, employ teachers, or drive themselves to lessons, it is imperative that some adult provide that gift for them. If you, as an aunt, uncle, god-parent, grand-parent, parent, or friend of the familiy, have a young child in your life, please help him take music lessons. That sacrifice on your part probably will not result in a new child prodigy going out on a new concert tour. No. It will be much better than that! 

The result will be that all of mankind will benefit from intelligent people growing up to solve old problems, create new techniques to improve life, design better structures, and increase understanding between members of the human race. 

Is it possible to leave a more beautiful legacy than that?

Copyright 2018 by Kaye Fairweather

*Pudewa began his career in education by working with Shin’ichi Suzuki and his method of teaching young children to play the violin in Japan and has since adapted Suzuki’s educational philosophy to other areas of education and established the IEW. One may find his speeches and footnotes on this and other scientific experiments regarding  music and intellectual development at the website: Institute for Excellence in Writing.

** Piano Guys study accompaniment:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=py_uxBfEkrI&feature=em-subs_digest

 

 

Science Is Beauty

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Image courtesy of Pexel

“First of all, as we have already remarked, for science beauty is objective, ‘out there’. Among the mechanistic suppositions of previous generations was the idea that beauty is an inner attitude of the beholder rather than a property of the objective world. The awareness that the universe is stunningly beautiful wherever we turn out eye is now so much a conviction of our most productive scientists that objective grandeur is considered a warrant of truth.”

Thomas  Dubay, SM,  The Evidential Power of Beauty