The Beautiful Life

“I have an idea that the only thing which makes it possible to regard this world we live in without disgust is the beauty which now and then men create out of the chaos.

The pictures they paint, the music they compose, the books they write, and the lives they lead. Of all these the richest in beauty is the beautiful life.

That is the perfect work of art.”

W. Somerset Maugham

Beauty in Numbers According to Titian

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As I’ve been saying, beauty is everywhere – every area of nature, science, art, architecture, music, prose, poetry, and human interaction. But some of us need to educate ourselves before we can more fully enjoy the pleasures of beauty.

Beauty in nature, art, and literature were always easy for me to see. I got a vague understanding of the relationship of math to music when I began to play the piano in grade school. (I didn’t last long enough to perform well, but I did develop a love for good music.) I began to appreciate the people who relentlessly offered the world beautiful reactions to ugly provocations as a teenager facing the vagaries of growing up.

Only recently, have I begun to observe the beauty of numbers, largely through a book, The Way of Beauty by David Clayton:

“We are used to the idea today of numbers being used to communicate quantity — that is, to answer the questions of how much? or how many? This is unchanged from the past. However, we are not so used today to the idea that number can convey a quality. . . . . through a symbolism. . . .

“Although most people today are unaware of the idea of symbolic number and harmonious proportions, when presented with the beauty that it reflects, they respond. Millions of people visit Oxford every year. When they come as tourists, they do not head on the whole for the modern housing estates or industrial buildings on the outskirts of the city. Rather, they go to the older center of the town. . . . These tourists very likely do not know why they find these buildings beautiful, but they know that they do. . . .”

Another example of numbers being symbolic as well as used for measuring, is found in Francesco Giorgi’s notes from his 16th Century plans for building a church in Venice:

““April 1, 1535 – In order to build the fabric of the church with those fitting and very harmonious proportions which one can do without altering anything that has been done, I should proceed in there following manner. I should like the width of the nave to be nine paces which is the square of three, the first and divine number. The length of the nave, which will be twenty-seven will have a triple proportion, which makes a diapason and a dispense. And this is the mysterious harmony that when Plato in the times wished to describe the wonderful consonance of the arts and fabric of the world, he took this as the first foundation of his description.

“The fact that this was not an unusual approach and that the use of these numbers was not limited to the profession of architecture at this time is demonstrated by looking at the people who assessed Giorgio’s report. On reception of the Memorandum, the Doge consulted a committee of three experts who had to approve it before he would implement it, which they did. The three were a philosopher (a humanist called Sansovino), a famous architect called Sergio, and an artist, who was no less than Titian.”

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“Everything Is Beautiful, in Its’ Own Way”

“The scientist does not study nature because it is useful to do so. He studies it because he takes pleasure in it, and he takes pleasure in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful it would not be worth knowing, and life would not be worth living.

I am not speaking, of course, of the beauty which strikes the senses, of the beauty of qualities and appearances. I am far from despising this, but it has nothing to do with science. What I mean is that more intimate beauty which comes from the harmonious order of its parts, and which a pure intelligence can grasp.” 653ce210d685f03c70a44dcebebca315

Henri Poincaré, Science and Method

Computers Are Beautiful, Banks Are Beautiful, Computer Criminals Are Ugly

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I love the computer age, but hate the criminals who use hacking techniques to harass or steal. It seems to me that they  lack even the honor of a common  street criminal becausethey attack in secret from afar, never revealing their whereabouts. They use the technology that could unite the human race against the unsuspecting innocents.

I ran into some this morning just as I was preparing to post another few thoughts about beauty. But my happy task was interrupted by a strong baritone voice coming from a news site that I frequent, telling me that my computer had been taken over and all my passwords had been copied. I quickly turned off the computer, knowing that it’s best to never obey their instructions.

Once it was off and my heart rate went down to near normal, I called my bank to ask what to do next. At that moment, my money seemed much more important than my privacy in emails, journals, blogs, or news sites. They explained this was a phishing scheme, but the criminals could not get my information unless I engaged them in conversation.

Someone in the bank’s fraud department told me how to use my phone as a two step authentication, like WordPress. For now, that provides better protection than the password and secret questions I had been using to access my accounts.  And they promised to double check for suspicious activity the next few days. So now, I’m back to a new normal, slightly nervous, but ready to venture into the cyber-world again.  And hoping the good programmers can continue to stay a step or two ahead of the bad guys.

Walking in Beauty

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My Mid-summer Protective Shield from Slings and Arrows:

the view from my dining table where St. Francis needs to be rescued from wisteria

Walking in beauty is not something reserved for the rich and famous. Beauty is for everyone, everywhere. It is there for the taking by observation, by hearing, by selecting, or by using. Obtaining it for oneself requires mindfulness more than money. Use it daily in your life to enjoy, to console, to inspire, and to change. Delighting in beauty is a bedrock of a happy life because that awareness helps us to gratefully notice the good things that come our way.

One’s home, whether house, apartment, or dormitory room, is probably the first place to consider in choosing beauty. For home is where we go each day to recover from “the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.” There is where we rest, refresh, and restore. So we owe it to ourselves to make our space beautiful for us.

Whenever buying any necessity, no matter how small your budget, think first of what delights your eye, whether selecting a trash bin or a chair for the living room. For example, if you need to get a new dust pan anyway, buy the blue or red one unless janitorial grey really is your favorite color. That way, there is one less reason to hate the process of cleaning house. As you choose the tools for living needed in each room, always select the one with the color or form that speaks to you. Even a dish scrubber can make your heart sing – see the July 18, blog post, “Is This Beautiful?”

“To thine own self be true”. . . Shakespeare

Never mind the “decorating” magazines; be true to your own tastes when arranging your home. Home is our refuge, where we can most be ourselves and indulge in our desires for color, art, arrangements, furniture, etc. that we love. It’s where we shine, revealing our true selves. Revel in your choices whenever you get to make them for your home, and decide on the object that most “speaks” to you or to you and your roomie.

If you have to live with what has been given to you even though you hate it, consider making it less ugly. Budgeteers quickly find that paint is their best friend because it remains the cheapest and quickest way to change the looks of any thing. Paint companies continuously work to make painting easier for us amateurs. If the chairs around your dining table don’t match, paint them all the same color to reduce the disparity. And the table can always be a different color or finish. Or if the table is hopelessly ugly, throw a sheet over it for camouflage, then add place mats or tablecloth on top before setting the table.

Improvise until you can afford better. Occasionally, you’ll end up loving your ugly duckling too much to ever let it go.

Copyright by Kaye Fairweather 2017

Things The Grandchildren Should Know

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“Life is so full of unpredictable beauty and strange surprises. Sometimes that beauty is too much for me to handle. Do you know that feeling? When something is just too beautiful? When someone says something or plays something that moves you to the point of tears, maybe even changes you.”

Mark Oliver Everett, Things The Grandchildren Should Know

Walk in Beauty I

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Life is full of beauty. Notice it.

Notice the bumble bee, the small child,

and the smiling faces.

Smell the rain, and feel the wind.

Live your life to the fullest potential,

and fight for your dreams.

Ashley Smith

Picture from Martha Tate (Garden Photo of the Day)